Best Ways to Boost Your Immune System

With the Corona virus shutting down many countries in 2020, individuals with health challenges have chosen to limit social contacts and shutter in. Health organizations have focused prevention on social distancing, hand washing and face mask wearing.

We have an immune system which has successfully fought off illnesses throughout history. The famous germ theory versus terrain debate is what divides integrative medicine from more conventionally practiced medicine. Those in the terrain health camp know the immune system is the key to fighting all viruses and illness, including the most recent covid-19 virus.

While washing hands, limiting contact with sick individuals and quarantine of ill persons has been successfully used historically, what also makes sense is building one’s immune system. There are many steps one can take to do so. These include sunbathing, outdoors activity, exercise, good sleep, earthing, positive outlooks, healthy diets, and taking targeted nutritional supplements, vitamins and herbs.

By increasing one’s self care protocol, you can take charge of your health and feel safer when venturing out during the current pandemic. There are also steps one can take if symptoms of illness arise like sore throats, runny nose and coughing for extra boosting and healing.

Benefits of Sun

The benefits of sunshine to health are well established. Only recently have individuals been warned to limit sun exposure. Sun is now well known to help create vitamin D, but natural light has many more health benefits, including increasing immune function, improving eye sight, increasing mitochondria and creating healing. Sunbathing for a minimum of 20 minutes daily is recommended during warmer months, but exposure of eyes and skin throughout the year is beneficial.

Exercise

Excersing is another way to boost one’s immune system and mood. Exercise is a well established activity that improves sleep, mood, heart and lung health. Every organ of one’s body benefits from movement.  Both cardiovascular and strength training activities are beneficial. Interval training exercise for just 12 minutes daily create tremendous health benefits.  Dr. Al Sears has done tremendous research documenting the health benefits of interval training exercise for 12 minutes.

Walking and spending time outdoors

Walking outdoors is a safe activity most can engage in to help with mood and overall health. During these times of limited social activity, it is especially important to get outdoors and enjoy the healing benefits of sunshine, fresh air and the sounds of nature. Walking outdoors barefoot, with one’s feet touching the ground, is even healthier, because the earth’s electrons are anti-inflammatory and healing. Spending time in nature is also known to be calming and beneficial to health.

Sleep

While sleeping our bodies heal and rejuvenate. Seven to nine hours is recommended and earlier is better if possible. Listening to your body and getting adequate sleep is essential for good health. Natural supplements which can help with sleep include GABA and L-tryptophan. If needed CBD oil is another safe supplement which can enhance sleep. Epsom salt baths, minimizing blue light exposure in the evening and developing  good sleep hygiene habits are important steps toward improving and maintaining good sleep.

Positive Attitude

Fear damages one’s immune system. The power of a positive attitude is well established to promote healing and boost one’s immune system. Using cognitive therapy strategies can help improve one’s thinking. David Burns MD has many excellent books and resources on the easy use of cognitive therapy strategies to improve one’s outlook.

Nutrition

The Weston Price Foundation is a powerhouse of information detailing nutrient dense foods that can boost the immune system. Dr. Weston Price studied endemic cultures for 10 years in the early 1930’s discovering that these people enjoyed superior mental, physical and dental health by eating unprocessed foods available to them, including raw foods and healthy animal fats. These cultures consumed 4 to 10 times more water and fat soluble vitamins compared to the average American diet at that time. They enjoyed a natural immunity to tuberculosis which was common then. They also had perfect teeth, with no cavities or need for orthodontia.

An easy way to remember these dietary principles is to eat foods the way your great grandparents ate them, before the advent of fake, highly processed and unhealthy non foods. Every culture has traditional, healthy and delicious foods for both daily eating and special occasions.

Eating sunny side up pastured eggs with true sourdough bread toast with raw butter for breakfast, along with some fruit is nutrient dense. Old fashioned chicken soup, made from simmering pastured chicken or chicken bones with added vegetables, is full of vitamins. Organic fruits and vegetables, raw whole organic milk, pastured butter, wild salmon, oat porridge, soaked grains and legumes, and pastured beef, chicken and liver are traditional health foods. Preparation can be easy. My site Holistic Health to Go has many easy, delicious and healthy recipes.

Best Supplements

A good multi vitamin is essential now because our soils are very depleted of nutrients. Cod liver oil and K2 are important immune boosters. Cod liver oil contains vitamins  A and D in a perfect ratio. For virus prevention, vitamin C is a true superpower. Liposomal vitamin C is best absorbed and 1-10 grams can be taken daily. Tremendous research shows vitamin D is essential for our health and protective for Covid. Zinc combined with quercetin are also good for viral protection. B complex vitamins help mood and immunity. Omega 3 fish oil is a good overall supplement. Iodine, magnesium, glutathione, berberine, goldenseal, echinacea, Reishi mushrooms, colloidal silver, Kaolic garlic, ginger and selenium are other immune boosters.

Important supplements to treat a viral infection

Vitamin C is magical and high dosages can greatly help the immune system fight the cytokine storm resulting from a viral infection. Zinc and Quercetin can also greatly reduce a viral load associated with an infection. Increasing or maintaining other immune boosters is also beneficial when fighting any type of viral infection. Taking up to 100mg zinc daily along with upwards of 1,000 mg quercetin daily are considered safe dosages. Elderberry is considered beneficial for treatment of viruses, along with colloidal silver and raw Manuka honey.

Take Charge of Your Health

Taking responsibility for one’s health is an empowering step.  We have always had an immune system which fights disease. At the end of the day, it is only our bodies’ immune systems which are capable of healing of any kind. For viral illnesses, along with other contagious diseases boosting our immune system with the above strategies will help empower us to face the world with less fear.

Disclaimer: If one it taking medications of any kind or has any special health considerations, it is recommended to consult a physician prior to taking any supplementation. The information in this article is provided for educational purposes only. Please consult your personal healthcare provider before making any healthcare decisions for yourself.

Sources for this article and further research:

Curing the Incurable by Thomas Levy, MD

Mood Cure by Julia Ross

HolisticHealthToGo.com

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/04/20/zinc-dosage-for-immune-system.aspx

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2020/08/24/quercetin-and-vitamin-c-synergistic-effect.aspx

The Immune Summit, 2020

earthing.com

Michelle Goldstein

Michelle is a mental health therapist who incorporates holistic principles into her full time counseling practice. She is passionate about holistic nutrition, natural healing and food/ medical health freedoms. After immersing herself into alternative medicine, seeking answers to a family health crisis, she discovered that conventional healthcare recommendations often contribute to illness. She has written for Natural News, Vac Truth and other health news sites, beginning in February 2013. All of her articles and recipes to date can be found at her site Holistic Health to Go, http://holistichealthtogo.com/.

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About the Author

Michelle is a mental health therapist who incorporates holistic principles into her full time counseling practice. She is passionate about holistic nutrition, natural healing and food/ medical health freedoms. After immersing herself into alternative medicine, seeking answers to a family health crisis, she discovered that conventional healthcare recommendations often contribute to illness. She has written for Natural News, Vac Truth and other health news sites, beginning in February 2013. All of her articles and recipes to date can be found at her site Holistic Health to Go, http://holistichealthtogo.com/.

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Body Mass Index: How do you measure up?

Body mass index is a measure of body fat that is based upon an individual’s weight and height. Mathematically speaking it is the measure of a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters. Since BMI measures body fatness, it can indicate health problems associated with weight. This is not a direct measure of body fatness but has been shown to have similar results to those indicated by skinfold measurements, bioelectrical impedance, and underwater weighing.

Since the 1970s, the prevalence of obesity has risen, which for adults is having a BMI greater than or equal to 30 k/m2. Since the only information needed for this measurement are height and weight, BMI is an inexpensive and easily accessible tool for clinicians to use as a screening tool. However, the categorization may be too broad.

Below is a table showing the standard weight categories associated with BMI ranges for adults over age 20.

BMI WEIGHT STATUS
Below 18.5 Underweight
18.5-24.9 Normal or healthy weight
25.0-29.9 Overweight
30.0 and above Obese

Here would be an example of a 5’9” person:

Height Weight Range BMI Weight Status
5’9” 124 lbs or less Below 18.5 Underweight
  125 to 168 lbs 18.5 to 24.9 Normal or healthy weight
  169 to 202 lbs 25.0 to 29.9 Overweight
  203 lbs or more 30 or higher Obese

When it comes to children and teens, gender comes into play. This is because the amount of body fat changes with age and differs by sex. BMI for these ages are then categorized by percentile. Obesity for ages 2-19 year is defined as having a BMI at or above the 95% percentile of children of the same sex and age. For adults, women tend to have higher BMI than men. When it comes to ethnicity, African Americans tend to have less body fat than Caucasians and Asians have more body fat than Caucasians. Older people tend to have higher BMI, and athletes have lower BMI. The trouble is that athletes may have a high BMI due to higher muscularity rather than actual body fatness.

People who have higher BMI are at risk for stroke, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, sleep apnea, some cancers, low quality of life, and high cholesterol. Opponents of this measurement say it does not take into account bone and muscle. Regardless, it is used by many physicians to screen for body fatness and a precaution to performing medical procedures based on one’s health safety. Living an active lifestyle and eating a healthy diet are the keys to your well-being. Although a measurement is only a tool that can indicate an outcome, YOU have to decide to take the actions to be on the healthy BMI range and give your body the opportunity to look and feel its best.

https://academic.oup.com/aje/article/143/3/228/77940

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4890841/

https://academic.oup.com/aje/article/180/3/288/2739097

https://bmcobes.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2052-9538-1-9

everybodysfit

Megan Johnson McCullough owns a fitness studio in Oceanside CA called Every BODY’s Fit. She has an M.A. in Physical Education & Health Science, is a current candidate for her Doctorate in Health & Human Performance, and she’s an NASM Master Trainer & Instructor. She’s also a professional natural bodybuilder, fitness model, Wellness Coach, and AFAA Group Exercise Instructor.

ASPARAGUS: Spear me

By everybodysfit

Posted Friday, July 10, 2020 at 09:27am EDT

Keywords: asparagus, bloating, digestion, fiber, Folate, Inflammation, vegetables, Vitamin E, vitamin K, Weightloss

This green, white, or purple vegetable come in spears, is packed with nutrition, and is low in calories. There are plenty of reasons to consume this veggie. With only 90 calories in one cup, it’s pretty incredible that this amount also contains 57% of the recommended daily intake (RDI) for Vitamin K and 34% of the RDI for folate. Vitamin K is great for bone healthy and prevents blood clots. Folate is beneficial for cell growth and is also called Vitamin B9. This is very beneficial for a healthy pregnancy during the development stage of the baby. Lots of antioxidants can also be found in these spears, especially vitamins E and C.

The benefits continue with the assistance it provides for digestion. One cup has about 7% of the daily fiber that we need which helps with regular bowel movements. It has also been said to aid with weight loss because of its low caloric make up and the fact that asparagus is 94% water. Between the water and fiber content, the body is basically reaping only benefits from this vegetable. Maybe the only downfall is that it can make your pee smell funny. This is because asparagus contains high levels of amino acid asparagine which is a natural diuretic. Extra fluids and salt get flushed out, again which could help with weight loss. Bloating can also be reduced. It has also been known to help reduce the appearance of acne scars because of the niacin it contains. It has also been said to help with inflammation from arthritis.

Asparagus is also a very versatile vegetable because it can be eaten raw, boiled, grilled, steamed, or even roasted. It goes great in salads and dishes like stir-frys.  The name asparagus comes from the Greek word “sprout”. This vegetable grows very quickly when in the ideal conditions. Not as popular as traditional vegetables, but asparagus deserves some recognition. Great for a snack or in a dish, it can become part of a healthy balanced diet that the body can reap plenty of benefits from.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/asparagus-officinalis

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/asparagus-benefits

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4027291/

https://www.livescience.com/45295-asparagus-health.html

everybodysfit

Megan Johnson McCullough owns a fitness studio in Oceanside CA called Every BODY’s Fit. She has an M.A. in Physical Education & Health Science, is a current candidate for her Doctorate in Health & Human Performance, and she’s an NASM Master Trainer & Instructor. She’s also a professional natural bodybuilder, fitness model, Wellness Coach, and AFAA Group Exercise Instructor.